The bride has enough things to worry about leading up to the big day, the groom and his choice of attire should not be one of them.


We know you may not be used to thinking for more than five minutes about what you want to wear on any given day, but this is your wedding. It’s important and should be treated as such. A little extra thought and time will not kill you. In fact, it will lead to your most spectacular look. However, there are a few things that can go horribly wrong.


Here are the top five mistakes we see grooms make and how to avoid them:

1. Waiting until the last minute

The bride’s not waiting until the last minute to pick up her dress, why would you wait until the last minute to pick up your suit? This is one of the worst things you can do; there is so much room for disaster. Let’s not forget about Murphy's Law: "anything that can go wrong (probably) will go wrong."


You’ll have a dozen other tasks on your to-do list, there will not be time to worry about something that should have been taken care of already. Your bride and her wedding planning committee have strictly scheduled every minute of the rehearsal dinner and wedding day. Believe us when we say that picking up Grandma from the airport, remembering to eat, memorizing your vows, and fixing a ruined suit cannot all get done in between whatever else your bride has planned for you.


Everything might turn out fine, but some simple Google searches would point otherwise. We have seen it all. Wrong sizes, wrong colors, even no garments at all. Or you might go to pick up the suit the morning of the wedding and find the shop closed. It will cause unnecessary drama for the bride. And who would be at fault? You. The groom. Not a good way to start off a marriage.


Don’t let disaster strike. Order your suit or tux six months in advance and get it in your hands 14 days before your wedding. Don’t risk the pictures, they are forever.

2. Wrong Fit

A wedding is the most important photographic moment in any couple’s life. Do you want to look back at your wedding pictures, carefully taken and edited by a professional that you paid a lot of money for, and see sleeves that are too long or a baggy inseam? If your answer is anything but “no,” please seek help. Your bride should be able to set you straight.


Fit is just as important as every other element of your suit or tux. Invest a few extra dollars in 100% wool. It will look and feel better than a polyester blend. And, if you’re not getting fitted or trying on your suit before walking down the aisle, you’re, again, making room for disaster. You want to look your best, after all.

3. Going over budget

When picking out a suit or tux, it’s easier than you would imagine to go over your budget. There are a lot of pieces that come together for an entire wedding ensemble and each of those pieces is going to cost you, especially if you’re choosing to purchase, rather than rent. Aside from your jacket, pants, and shirt, you also have to think about all the accessories: shoes, tie, belt/suspenders, cufflinks, pocket square, etc.


If you’re planning on attending a gala every year, buying may be a good option for you, but if not, renting is the far more economical option. Plus, you don’t want to get stuck with an outfit that you wear only one other time.

4. Not coordinating with the wedding party

While it’s ultimately up to what the bride wants to see in her pictures, it’s also customary to have a little uniformity throughout the wedding party. No matter what, the groom is going to stand out, but you don’t want to stand out too much.


The style of your suit should match the style of the bride’s dress, as should the bridesmaids’ dresses and groomsmen’s attire. All colors involved should also be within the palette of the wedding. Your tie does not have to be the same color as the bridesmaids’ dresses, but it shouldn’t clash. When in doubt, ask the bride.

5. Wrong accessories

There’s some wiggle room when it comes to suits and your personal style, but there are also some tried and true ways to wear your accessories.


Tuxedos, being the classiest option, come with the most rules: do not wear a belt with a tux (the lack of belt loops should be your first clue), instead, opt for suspenders; studs and cufflinks should be worn with your tuxedo shirt; and bowties, rather than long ties, are traditionally worn with tuxedos.


Other guidelines to consider: nontraditional colors for socks are fine, but stray away from white; no brown shoes or belt with a black suit; and both a belt and suspenders are not necessary with a suit.


It’s wedding planning season for you and your bride. A vital time to avoid arguments. Instead, be the hero. Get involved and plan a stunning suit. It’s your day, too, and you should look great. 



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