Finding the perfect person to marry is one thing—knowing which wine glass to use for red and which cocktail glass to use for whiskey, though, is an entirely different problem. Drinking out of glassware that’s designed to bring out the best in your spirits makes a world of difference. Don’t believe us? Try drinking an IPA out of a champagne flute or sniffing brandy out of an American pint glass. But, from flutes to coupes, knowing which liquor goes with what glassware can be a headache and a half. So, to help ensure your wedding-day imbibing goes off without a hitch, we’ve broken down a handful of popular wedding stemware and glassware options below. Get ready to break into some bubbly—our list will leave you ready to celebrate!


Champagne Flutes

 

We’re starting off easy. Flutes (sometimes also called tulips) are used for champagne toasts, as the long stem allows guests a place to hold the flute without warming up the bubbly. Plus, the narrow design helps preserve carbonation.


Coupes

 

You probably recognize coupes from those all-too-fun champagne towers. Because of their wide mouth, though, they’re not great for actually drinking champagne (bubbles escape and the carbonation lessens), so stick to using them for the tower. Coupes can, though, be interchangeable with martini glasses for cocktails. So, if you prefer something a little more vintage over the classic streamlined look of a martini glass, coupes are perfect for serving up those postnuptial cocktails.


Rocks Glass

 

A rocks glass is a short tumbler with a thick bottom and wide opening to allow aroma to escape. It’s also called an old-fashioned glass and is commonly used for drinks that require muddling, white russians, or any kind of liquor on the rocks.


Highball

 

A highball is a tall, skinny glass with straight or angled sides. It’s typically used for things like bloody marys, screwdrivers or any highball cocktail (soda water + spirit). Highballs are also interchangeable with the Collins glass (which is just a narrower, taller version of the highball, typically used for drinks with straws).




Cocktail or Martini Glass

 

A martini glass or cocktail glass is that classic skinny-stem, wide-mouth glass used for everything from classic martinis to cosmopolitans. Its stem allows imbibers to hold the glass without warming the actual drink, and its streamlined look is classic and chic.


Hurricane Glass

 

Hello, daiquiris by the pool. The hurricane glass, often used for frozen drinks, flares at the top, narrows toward the middle and is heavy on the bottom. The flared top is designed to “show off” heavily-garnished drinks like pina coladas or lava flows.


Sniffer

 

A sniffer is that short-stemmed, super broad glass that reminds you of a professor sitting by a fireplace on a buttery leather couch in his dark den. (Or is that just us?) It has a large, wide bottom, tapers toward the top, and is generally used for serving brandy or whiskey straight-up.


American vs English vs Imperial Pint Glasses

 

American pint glasses are those classic 16-20-ounce glasses used for American lagers. Freezing these pint glasses before filling them helps keep beer cold and refreshing.


The English pint looks similar to an American pint glass, except it has the addition of a curved lip just two inches from the top. It’s perfect for IPAs, English and American ales, lagers, and stouts.


The Imperial pint glass is yet another type of pint glass used for Irish or English ales. It flares toward the top (but not in the lip-like manner of the English pint) and can hold up to 20 ounces. It’s perfect for brown ales (like Newcastle).


Burgundy Glass

 

Burgundy glasses are those really broad, wide wine glasses. They’re typically meant for lighter reds (like Pinot Noir).


Chardonnay Glass

 

A chardonnay glass is the widest of all the white-wine glasses. It essentially looks like a fishbowl on a stem. Its tapered top and long stem help to keep the wine cool (which is perfect for summer weddings and al fresco affairs).


Bordeaux Glass

 

A bordeaux glass is used for full-body reds (like Cabs). It has a long stem and relatively broad bowl (though not as broad as a burgundy or chardonnay glass).


Whew—you’ve officially made it through our glassware roundup, which we think calls for a cocktail (or two)! So, put your skills to the test tonight and see if you can’t reach for the right glass for that cosmo or screwdriver.


Photo courtesy Atlanta wedding photographer Shelby Rae Photographs

Styling by Atlanta wedding planner Chancey Charm

Bar by Gunshow